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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

3 edition of The religious policy of the Mughal emperors found in the catalog.

The religious policy of the Mughal emperors

Sri Ram Sharma

The religious policy of the Mughal emperors

by Sri Ram Sharma

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  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in London, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Mogul Empire
    • Subjects:
    • Mogul Empire -- Religion

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Sri Ram Sharma.
      SeriesSAMP early 20th-century Indian books project ;, item 10871.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsMicrofilm BVB-ENG-538 (D)
      The Physical Object
      FormatMicroform
      Paginationx, 226 p.
      Number of Pages226
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL328262M
      LC Control Number97909378

      Aurangzeb, also spelled Aurangzib, Arabic Awrangzīb, kingly title ʿĀlamgīr, original name Muḥī al-Dīn Muḥammad, (born November 3, , Dhod, Malwa [India]—died March 3, ), emperor of India from to , the last of the great Mughal emperors. Under him the Mughal Empire reached its greatest extent, although his policies. Akbar, the greatest of the Mughal emperors of India. He reigned from to and extended Mughal power over most of the Indian subcontinent. In order to preserve the unity of his empire, Akbar adopted programs that won the loyalty of the non-Muslim populations of his realm.

      The Mughal court became the scene of factions among the nobles. The weakness of the empire was exposed when Nadir Shah imprisoned the Mughal Emperor and looted Delhi in The causes for the downfall of the Mughal Empire were varied. To some extent, the religious and Deccan policies of Aurangazeb contributed to its decline. The zamidars exercised great deal of power in some areas. Their exploitation by Mughal administrators forced them to rebel against it. These revolts collectively by zamindars and peasants challenged the stability of the empire from the end of the 17th century. A closer look at Akbar’s policies. Abul Fazl wrote a book titled Akbar Nama.

      Results of the religious policy of Aurangzeb: The religious fanaticism of Aurangzeb overshadowed his virtues. His reversal of Akbar’s policy of religious toleration resulted in weakening the entire structure of the Mughal empire. It led to several conflicts and wars in different parts of the country. These conflicts were: (i) Conflict with. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, gift of Jane Greenough Green in memory of Thomas Pelton Green (AC) At its height, a period extending from the middle of the 16th century to the beginning of the 18th, the Mughal Empire controlled almost the entire Indian subcontinent, marshaling vast amounts of money and manpower. The best-known members of the Mughal dynasty are its first emperors.


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The religious policy of the Mughal emperors by Sri Ram Sharma Download PDF EPUB FB2

These and other questions concerning the religious policy of the Mughal emperors have raised a dust of controversy. This study, based not only on original historical data upon the subject but also the theories of the early Arab jurists, the practices of Muslim kings elsewhere and the verbose discussions of writers outside India, holds that Cited by: Contents: 1.

Babur and Humayun. Akbar and the foundation of a new order Jahangir. Shah Jahan. Aurangzeb the puritan. Nature of the state in Mughal India. Bibliography. Index.

"In the dust of controversy raised over the religious policy of the Mughal emperors in India, the nature of the Mughal state has become very much clouded.

About the Book The historians have variously described the nature of the Mughal State in India. Description that the Mughal rule was oriental despotism that it had a divine origin which invested the Mughal emperors with Divine Rights, have only raised the dust of controversy about the religious policy of the Mughal emperors.

In this present study, in which the author has consulted not only. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sharma, Sri Ram. Religious policy of the Mughal emperors.

[London, New York, Bombay, etc.] H. Milford, Oxford University. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sharma, Sri Ram. Religious policy of the Mughal emperors. New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, ADVERTISEMENTS: Religious policy of the Mughul emperors, from Babur to Aurangzeb, has provided an ideal for the ruling class of India, viz., the ruling class of India should pursue a policy of religious toleration and equality.

Babur and Humayun had no time to pursue a clear-cut religious policy. Akbar followed the policy of religious toleration [ ]. 20 rows  The Mughal emperors (or Moghul) built and ruled the Mughal Empire on the Indian. ADVERTISEMENTS: Historians and thinkers have given conflicting views regarding the religious policy followed by the Mughal rulers.

The matter has been made so complex, that it is not possible to sift facts. However one may try to be objective, one’s vision still remains coloured according to one’s prejudiced approach on account of the influence exercised [ ]. Religious policy of Mughal Emperor Akbar.

September 8, September 7, Two classical texts related to Sufi pantheism – Masanavi of Jalaluddin Rumi and Diwan of Hafiz were two favorite books of Akbar.

AD Before Akbar was quoted in the post of Kalmas and Khalifas, but in AD After that, the verses describing the glory of the. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sharma, Sri Ram. Religious policy of the Mughal emperors.

New York, Asia Pub. House [] (OCoLC) The Mughal Empire in India was established by Babur. Babur, a descendant of two of history’s most famous figures – Timur and Genghis Khan, was the first Mughal ruler to acquire territory in India, his grandson, Akbar is considered to be the one to truly establish Mughal rule.

Buy The Religious Policy Of The Mughal Emperors by Sri Ram Sharma (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Religious policy of the Mughal emperors. New York, Asia Pub. House [] (OCoLC) Online version: Sharma, Sri Ram.

Religious policy of the Mughal emperors. New York, Asia Pub. House [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Sri Ram Sharma.

The Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II (–) made futile attempts to reverse the Mughal decline but ultimately had to seek the protection of the Emir of Afghanistan, Ahmed Shah Abdali, which led to the Third Battle of Panipat between the Maratha Empire and the Afghans (led by Abdali) in Religious Policy Of The Mughal Emperors Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item : Sharma, Sri Ram ioned: TZ ble: TZ. Akbar the Great, Muslim emperor of India, established a sprawling kingdom through military conquests but is known for his policy of religious tolerance.

Akbar is the main character in Empire of the Moghul: Ruler of the World by Alex Rutherford, the third book in a sextet based on the six great Mughal Emperors of the Mughal Dynasty. Video games. Akbar is featured in the video game Sid Meier's Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword as a. A few core issues or groups of issues that form the basis of the debate can be identified here, namely: (a) the personality and religion of the Mughal emperors, in particular the religious policy of Aurangzeb (or 'Alamgir, r.

), which alienated large sections of the population; (b) the nature of the assignment system, or the jagirdari. The religious policy of the Mughal emperors was, on the whole, a tolerant one.

Though staunch Sunnis personally, Babur and Humayun were tolerant. Akbar's policy was positively motivated towards achieving the cultural unity of India.

Akbar's was a liberal and enlightened policy. He abolished pilgrim tax and jaziya in and respec­tively. The Mughal emperor Jahangir, in AD, continued his father’s freedom of religion, except that he led a persecution of Sikh people.

Sikhism was pretty new. Mughal dynasty, Muslim dynasty of Turkic-Mongol origin that ruled most of northern India from the early 16th to the midth century. The administrative organization of the Mughal Empire allowed it to prosper for more than two centuries before being overrun by the Marathas.

The British exiled the last Mughal.Akbar’s religious policy and his treatment towards the Hindus healed strife and bitterness and produced an environment of harmony and goodwill where there had been racial and religious antagonism of a most distressing character. Home ›› Indian History ›› Mughal Emperors ›› Akbar ›› Religious Views ›› Religious Views of Akbar.

Emperor Akbar, the greatest of the Mughal emperors, who ruled India from tillleft a legacy of tolerance, virtuousness, harmony, and prosperity. Ira Mukhoty’s definitive and.